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Photo Info

Dimensions7200 x 4800
Original file size9.91 MB
Image typeJPEG
Color spaceUnknown
Date taken12-Jun-18 16:59
Date modified18-Jun-18 22:58
Shooting Conditions

Camera makeCanon
Camera modelCanon EOS 7D
Focal length28 mm
Max lens aperturef/4
Exposure1/30 at f/6.3
FlashNot fired, compulsory mode
Exposure bias0 EV
Exposure modeManual
Exposure prog.Manual
ISO speedISO 100
Metering modeSpot
Tri-Level

Tri-Level

Nelson, NV. Population 9 people, and a gazillion old cars and trucks, and rattlesnakes.

The area known as Nelson was originally called Eldorado in 1775, by the Spaniards who made the original discoveries of gold in the area that is now Eldorado Canyon. The town was the site of one of the first major gold strikes in Nevada and one of the biggest mining booms in state history. Gold and silver were discovered here around 1859. The rush to the canyon began in 1861, several mining camps were established in the canyon, and a steamboat landing at the mouth of the canyon on the Colorado River, called Colorado City.

In its heyday, the area established a reputation for being rough and lawless. During the American Civil War, deserters from both the Union and Confederate armies would wander there, hoping that such an isolated location would be the last place military authorities would look for them.

Among the early mines established was the notorious Techatticup Mine in the middle of the canyon. Disagreements over ownership, management and labor disputes resulted in wanton killings so frequent as to be routine and ordinary. Despite the sinister reputation of the mine, it along with others in the town produced several million dollars in gold, silver, copper and lead. The mines in the canyon were active from about 1858 until 1945. Wikipedia